Savory Institute at Colorado Innovation Network Summit

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CURIOSITY is our natural state of inquisitiveness that drives us to explore,
investigate, learn and improve, and it was the theme of the 2015 COIN SUMMIT.

On August 24-25, Savory Institute CEO Daniela Ibarra Howell participated in the Colorado Innovation Network (COIN) Summit, an invitation-only event hosted by Colorado Governor Jim Hickenlooper.

COIN The Colorado Innovation Network (COIN) is a catalyst for economic prosperity through innovation by partnering with government, business and civil society to foster collaboration around global ideas, talent, capital and the entrepreneurial spirit. Launched by Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper in 2011, the network is a privately funded organization that lives within the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade.

The Summit (http://www.coloradoinnovationnetwork.com/coin-summit/summit-2015/) was an inspiring learning and networking event where delegates had a chance to challenge themselves and each other to explore questions around how Self, Connections, Infrastructure and Global Issues will shape the future of businesses and economic prosperity.

Daniela spoke to the other delegates about Holistic Management and the work of the Savory Institute to facilitate the large scale restoration of the world’s grasslands, with focus on the global Savory Network of entrepreneurial leaders working to transform agriculture in Colorado, the US, and worldwide. The Savory Hub Network is an innovative distribution mechanism for Holistic Management training and implementation support to land managers around the globe.

With Headquarters in Boulder, and one of their Hubs near Denver, Colorado, the Savory Institute is providing an entrepreneurial and self-sustaining business model for scaling restorative and profitable agriculture, food and water security, and resilience to climate change.

“Solutions to resource management problems need to be contextually relevant, self-sustaining, and scalable” said Daniela Ibarra-Howell. She emphasized the importance of policy and market incentives to reward regenerative agriculture and better land management practices, noting that “informed public opinion and consumer education will help drive positive changes in policy and align market signals”. Policy makers and corporations can’t lead, they can only follow public will – although “this is of course not the case for Colorado” she said tongue in cheek.

Other delegates included executives from Kiva, Google, The Nature Conservancy, Amazon, and other innovative organizations.

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